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Graduate Training Program at the University of Kansas: A US News & World Report Top 25 Program

The Clinical Psychology Graduate Training Program at the University of Kansas was established in the mid 1940s, and was represented at the original Boulder Conference. The program has been continuously accredited since 1949, and was among the first wave of clinical programs to be accredited by the APA. The Program is a member of the Academy of Psychological Clinical Science and the Council of Clinical Health Psychology Training Programs.

 

Program Philosophy

The program adheres to the Boulder Model and strives to not only strike a balance between the scientist and practitioner features of clinical psychology, but also focuses on the integration of science and practice. We believe that competent clinical practitioners must understand, appreciate, and apply the science associated with effective clinical interventions, and that competent clinical researchers must have first-hand experience with clinical disorders that is both broad and in-depth. Accordingly, we aim to produce professionals who demonstrate mastery of knowledge in the field of scientific psychology and who will have (1) the ability to generate new scientific knowledge and theory related to the field of psychology, and (2) can make independent contributions to the evolving base of skills and scientific knowledge required for clinical practice. Moreover, our objective is to train graduates who approach all their work from a strong ethical foundation.

 

Student Admissions, Outcomes, and Other Data

Student Handbook

 

Overview of the Program

The curriculum proceeds from core courses providing an educational foundation to more specialized topics geared toward students' individual interests. During the first year of the program, students complete courses aimed at ensuring basic knowledge in psychopathology, research methodology, psychological assessment, statistics, and biological foundations of psychopathology. Also during the first year, students begin attending colloquia and other professional issues-related presentations designed to acquaint them with current research in the program and field more generally, to orient them to current ethical and professional issues in the field, and to further the process of professional enculturation. Additionally, students are encouraged to attend any research groups that interest them. Students are welcome to attend more than one group despite working officially with one professor, allowing for a greater breadth of exposure to various methods and topics.

During their second year, students begin seeing clients in the KU Psychological Clinic, having been prepared for this by a comprehensive clinic orientation during the summer of their first year. Second-year students also are working on completing their masters theses, as well as taking other core psychology and clinical psychology courses.

The "task requirement" is a central feature of the third year. As noted previously (see above section titled "Task Requirement") it may take the form of a literature review, a clinical intervention demonstration, or a program evaluation project. The course work during the third year is comprised of both elective and required classes, and students continue their practicum training in the KU Psychological Clinic (or the KU Medical Center in the case of students in the Clinical Health Subspecialty).

Fourth-year students generally have completed most of their course work and their required practica, and focus on the doctoral dissertation. Also, during the fall of the fourth (or fifth) year, most students complete the application process for the predoctoral internship, thereafter spending their final year in the program at an internship site.

Clinical Health Track

In addition to training in clinical psychology, the program offers a Clinical Health Track. This track has been a key part of the Clinical Psychology Program since 1977. Work in this specialty centers around the psychosocial and biomedical aspects of physical health, illness, and disability. Students are prepared to apply the knowledge and techniques learned to problems of prevention, assessment, treatment and rehabilitation.

 

Sample Sequence of Program Requirements:

1st YEAR

Fall Semester

     •PSYC 798: Psychological Statistics: Foundations & Applications
     •PSYC 898: Professional Issues in Clinical & Health Psychology
     •PSYC 961: Biological Foundations of Psychopathology
     •PSYC 968: Research Methods in Clinical Psychology


Spring Semester

     •PSYC 790 Statistical Methods in Psychology I
            (Or an alternative that satisfies the quantitative analysis requirement.)
     •PSYC 850: Assessment I: Foundations of Psych. Assessment
     •PSYC 898: Professional Issues in Clinical & Health Psychology
     •PSYC 946: Theories and Methods of Psychotherapy
     •PSYC 960: Advanced Psychopathology
     •PSYC 899: Thesis

Summer Semester

     •PSYC 899: Thesis
     •Elective (PSYC 977-Prep for beginning practicum)

                                                                                       

2nd YEAR

Fall Semester

      •PSYC 855: Assessment II: Ingtegrative Psychological Assessment

      •PSYC 898: Professional Issues in Clinical & Health Psychology
      •PSYC 964: Clinical Practicum I
      •PSYC 975: Professional & Ethical Problems in Clinical Psychology
      •PSYC 899: Thesis

Spring Semester

      •PSYC 898: Professional Issues in Clinical & Health Psychology
      •PSYC 965: Clinical Practicum II
      •PSYC 899: Thesis
      •Psychology Core Requirements or Electives

      •PSYC 899: Thesis

Summer Semester

      •PSYC : 66 Clinical Practicum III
      •PSYC: 899 Thesis

    

3rd YEAR

Fall Semester

      •PSYC 888: Diversity Issues in Clinical Psychology
      •PSYC 969 or PSYC 835 Clinical Practicum IV
      •PSYC 898: Professional Issues in Clinical & Health Psychology
      •PSYC 805: History and Systems of Psychology
      •PSYC 950: Supervision & Consultation: Theory & Research
      •Psychology Core Requirements or Electives


Spring Semester

      •PSYC 898: Professional Issues in Clinical & Health Psychology
      •PSYC 970 or PSYC 836 Clinical Practicum V
      •Psychology Core Requirements or Electives
      •PSYC 999 Dissertation


Summer Semester

     • PSYC 999 Dissertation
          

4th YEAR

Fall Semester

      •Psychology Core Requirements or Electives
      •PSYC 999: Dissertation


Spring Semester

      •Psychology Core Requirements or Electives
      •PSYC 999: Dissertation

Summer Semester

      •Electives
      •PSYC 999 Dissertation
                                                            

5th YEAR

Fall, Spring, & Summer Semesters

      •PSYC 974 Internship

 

Financial Aid

Various types of financial assistance are available to students in the Clinical Program. These include University Fellowships administered through the Graduate School, and teaching assistantships funded through the Department of Psychology, and research assistantships. Although the Clinical Program has been able to offer financial assistance to all of its entering students and nearly all of its continuing graduate students in recent years, we cannot guarantee this in the future. However, it is expected that a reasonable supply of paid, part-time positions of a psychological nature in various programs of the University and surrounding areas will be available for advanced students, along with research assistantships on faculty grants.

 

For additional information or questions on the accreditation of the KU Clinical Psychology Program, contact the Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation, American Psychological Association, 750 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242. Web: http://www.apa.org/ed/accreditation/ Phone: 202-336-5979. E-Mail: apaaccred@apa.org.

 


 


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