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Brandon Bailey

Brandon Bailey
1st year student
Office: Fraser 528
Email: brandonbailey@ku.edu

 

 

 


Nichol Castro

Nichol Castro

1st year student
Office: Fraser 536
Email: ncastro@ku.edu

My research interests are in language perception and production processes. Questions include: Why are some words more difficult to retrieve than others? Why do we produce disfluent speech? Particularly, I am interested in studying the impact aging and cognitive decline have on language processes. I am currently working under Dr. Michael Vitevitch in the Spoken Language Laboratory.

 


Un-So Diener

Un-So Diener

7th year student
Office: Fraser 539
Email: lareun@ku.edu

Research Interests: I am interested in figuring out how the way words are spelled and the way word parts combine to make different words affect how we recognize them when we read.  For example, English is a very difficult language to spell in terms of sounds (e.g. why is "sign" not spelled "sine?"), but that complicated spelling can also inform us about related words (e.g. "sign" and "signature" are related).  I am also interested in whether people think of "butter" when they see the word "butterfly."  Investigating these issues will inform us more on how words are organized in our mind.


Linzi Gibson

Linzi Gibson

6th year student
Office: Fraser 536
Email: mslinzi@ku.edu

Research Interests: I'm a second year student working in the Attention and Emotion Lab (AEL) where we are examining the lateralization of attentional processes in semantics, as in semantic priming. Research tools of the AEL are principally that of event-related potentials (ERPs), a brainwave technique, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a brain scanner technique.


Rutherford Goldstein

Rutherford Goldstein

3rd year student
Office: Fraser 528
Email: rgolds@ku.edu

I am a third year student in the Cognitive Psychology program at the University of Kansas. I work in the Spoken Language Laboratory with Dr. Michael Vitevitch as my adviser. My research interests lie in the area where language and memory meet: the mental lexicon. Questions I attempt to address are: What aspects of a word make it easier (or harder) to process? Why do we make mistakes in verbal communication? What happens when a word is not produced or recognized correctly? Past projects I've been involved in use the tools of the new science of networks to look at issues such as lexicon structure; specifically how structure affects different lexical processes.  I also work in Susan Kemper's Reading in Older and Younger Adults laboratory.  Current projects include looking at age differences in ignoring distractors.

 


Chelsie Hadlock
2nd year student
Email: caisha@ku.edu

Research Interests:


Rebecca Lepping

Rebecca Lepping, M.A.

Doctoral Candidate (ABD)
Office: Fraser 528
Email: rchamber@ku.edu

Rebecca was awarded her B.A. in Psychology in 1999 from Wichita State University, her M.A. in Psychology of Music in 2004 from the University of Sheffield in Sheffield, England, and her M.A. in Piano Performance in 2008 at the University of Missouri - Kansas City Conservatory of Music. She began her PhD program in Cognitive Psychology with Dr. Ruth Ann Atchley in the Psycholinguistics ERP lab (PERPL) at the University of Kansas in 2009, and is an fMRI Graduate Research Assistant at the Center for Health Behavior Neuroscience with Dr. Cary Savage at the University of Kansas Medical Center. She has been working in Dr. Savage’s lab since 2005 on functional MRI studies of reward and motivation in obesity and Prader-Willi syndrome, and studies of memory in traumatic brain injured patients, Alzheimer’s disease, and aging musicians.  She is currently studying how emotional information, such as words, pictures, and music, is processed by healthy individuals and in people with major depressive disorder using ERP and fMRI, while still finding time to play music, knit, cook, and spend time with her family and pets.

 


Goffrey Priester

Geoffrey Priester

2nd year student
Office: Fraser 528
Email: gpriester@ku.edu

Research Interests:My research focuses on how we use emerging technologies (smartphones, tablets, and augmented reality systems) to engage with our surroundings, especially in a spacial capacity. This includes how we interpret multimodal navigation cues, the effects of multitasking and possible distractions of these devices, and the translations between real and virtual environments. I work with Dr. Paul Atchley in the Visual Information Processing laboratory.


Ellen Rozek

Ellen Rozek

Doctoral Candidate (ABD)
Office: Fraser 528
Email: erozek@ku.edu

I work with Dr. Susan Kemper in her Language Across the Lifespan Lab. My research interests are guided by a desire to improve people’s lives through better understanding of the cognitive changes that occur during normal and atypical aging. This has led to three major topical areas: Executive Function, Social Interaction, and Retirement Communities. My research interests have the potential to be adapted into interventions to relieve loneliness, improve reading comprehension, or effect positive changes in the lives of older adults. I believe one of the great benefits to being a gerontologist is its interdisciplinary nature which supports collaboration. My dissertation project, The Effect of Loneliness on Executive Function in Young and Older Adults, focuses how loneliness can affect cognitive abilities. Does loneliness contribute to older adults cognitive processing problems? Loneliness is a social phenomenon; it is based on emotional isolation (i.e., lacking a close confidant or partner), social isolation (i.e., lacking a member or members of a social circle that an individual deems necessary), and a negative interpretation of one’s situation. Anyone can experience loneliness and its negative consequences for psychological and physical health. This research will improve our understanding of the consequences loneliness has on cognitive abilities. For information about my teaching philosophy, please visit my teaching portfolio (bit.ly/erozek_portfolio).



Cynthia Siew

Cynthia Siew

1st year student
Office: Fraser 536A
Email: csqsiew@ku.edu

I am a first-year graduate student working with Dr. Michael Vitevitch in the Spoken Language Laboratory. Generally, I am interested in the processes underlying spoken word recognition and speech perception, and in using the tools of network science to further our understanding of these processes. Other broad research interests include individual differences in word recognition performance, the structure and organization of our mental lexicons and how they influence word recognition, bilingualism and second language acquisition in both children and adults.

 


Sunkey Sun

Shengkai(Sunkey) Sun

4th year student
Office: Fraser 528
Email: shengkaisun@ku.edu

Research Interests: How do children and adults remember and cope with past adverse experiences? And how do these relate to emotional well-being? My research addresses these questions by investigating the relations among memories for traumatic and stressful events, emotion regulation and cognitive control, and psychological well-being. Currently I'm working with my advisor, Dr. Andrea Greenhoot, on two projects. In one project we examined how emerging adults recollect traumatic experiences, and how the qualities of these recollections (e.g., coherence, references to meanings) relate to their psychological adjustment. In the other study, we investigated the roles of parent-guide conversations in shaping young children's memories of and emotional reactions to a stressful event. I'm also interested in the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying coping and emotion regulation, and currently working with Dr. Lila Chrysikou on an investigation that examines the effects of tDCS in depression. 

 


Yana Yen

Yana Yen

2nd year student
Email: yanay@ku.edu

Research Interests: My current research interest is the effect of cognitive processes such as attention, memory, and emotion on formation of authentic self. Right now I am focusing on the role of attention in defensive behavior. As I develop my understanding of defensiveness as a cognitive process based on an interaction of attention, memory, and emotion, I plan to use it as an inverse measure to study authenticity.


Recent Cognitive Psychology Alumni
Sarah Bunnell, PhD.
Kit Ying Chan PhD.
Mark Chan PhD.
Jeff Dressel, PhD.
Aminda O’Hare, PhD.
Jonathon Schuster PhD.
Raylnn Schmalzried PhD.
Keith Young PhD.




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